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The Glass Menagerie

May 12, 13, 18, 19, 20 at 8:00 PM
May 14 at 2:00 PM

Director: Michael Pevzner

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Amanda Wingfield is a faded, tragic remnant of Southern gentility who lives in poverty in a dingy St. Louis apartment with her son, Tom, and her daughter, Laura. Amanda strives to give meaning and direction to her life and the lives of her children, though her methods are ineffective and irritating. Tom is driven nearly to distraction by his mother's nagging and seeks escape in alcohol and the world of the movies. Laura also lives in her illusions. She is crippled, and this defect, intensified by her mother's anxiety to see her married, has driven her more and more into herself.

The crux of the action comes when Tom invites a young man of his acquaintance to take dinner with the family. Jim, the caller, is a nice ordinary fellow who is at once pounced upon by Amanda as a possible husband for Laura. In spite of her crude and obvious efforts to entrap the young man, he and Laura manage to get along very nicely, and momentarily Laura is lifted out of herself into a new world. But in the end, the world of illusion that Amanda and Laura have striven to create in order to make life bearable, collapses about them.

Auditions

Tue/Wed, March 7 & 8, 7 pm NO APPOINTMENT NECESSARY

Auditioners will read from the script and may present a 1-2 minute contemporary, dramatic monologue.

Monologue is helpful, BUT NOT REQUIRED TO AUDITION. Please bring picture and resume (if available). Be prepared to list all possible rehearsal conflicts up to performance dates.

Questions: Contact the director at auditions@curtaincallbraintree.org or 781-910-2938

Roles

The Glass Menagerie is Tennessee Williams' dreamlike and heartbreaking memory play about lost hopes amid a Southern landscape. The 4 characters are:

 

Amanda - late 40's/50's A character of outlandish pretense; magnetic and pathetic. A onetime Southern belle, long ago abandoned by her husband, Amanda lives in a pastoral past, while struggling to stay on her feet in the dismal present. She is foolish, garrulous, forever nagging her children, Laura and Tom, to be successes, while steeped in her own self-pity.

Laura – early to mid-20's. Crippled from childhood, Laura is oddly beautiful and painfully shy. She spends her time polishing her collection of tiny glass animals, her "glass menagerie." Her presence is wispy, fragile, helpless, passive and dreamlike.

Tom – Mid-30's as he narrates the story & early 20's as he comes alive in his memory. He is a poet and the narrator of the play, and it is his memory that frames the action of the play. In the present, as he tells his story, he is grateful to have escaped his stultifying house, but is haunted by his guilt for leaving. In the memory scenes, he is increasingly frustrated by the demands placed on him by his mother, while achingly despairing of his sister's fragility.

Jim, “The Gentleman Caller” – Early to mid-20's. His glory days as a high school hero behind him, he now works at a menial job with Tom, who brings him to the house to fulfill Amanda's unceasing pleas for an eligible bachelor to call on Laura. Tom is outgoing and enthusiastic and he is kind to Laura. He is living in his own dreamworld of success and tenuous hopes.